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From a practical point of view, a Dragon's wings are the most important part of their anatomy, after all, Dragons were bred specifically to be an effective aerial fighting force, and in order to fulfill this goal, usable wings are a requirement. Wing injuries are some of the most delicate and involved repairs any Dragonhealer can ever do. There are three levels of wing scorings.

Levels of wing scoring:Edit

  • Light - consist of light tracks, the occasional hole, and maybe scores along the edges of the wing. Both Dragon and Rider will be uncomfortable.
  • Moderate - includes damage to edges and sails, but not to cartilages. The Rider will probably be uncomfortable, and the Dragon will be in some pain.
  • Severe - sails, cartilages, wingbones, and veins are all likely to be affected by these injuries. The injured Dragon will have to be restrained by a queen or perhaps two, depending on the severity of the injury, and the Rider will most likely need to be treated with a great deal of wine.

Cause:
Threadfall.

Cause 1: Light ThreadscoringEdit

Symptoms:
Little damage to any sails, veins, cartilages or edges. Rider and Dragon likely to be uncomfortable.

Treatment:

  1. Apply Numbweed to area.
  2. Stitch hide back together, if applicable.
  3. Apply Numbweed once more if required.

Recovery:
Approximately a sevenday. Check that there are no further injuries that have been missed. Depending on the location of the injury rehabilitate slowly.

Cause 2: Moderate scoringEdit

Symptoms:
This may include damage to edges, sails etc., but will not include cartilages. Rider likely to be uncomfortable, Dragon will be in some pain.

Treatment:

  1. The Rider should still be conscious, though more than slightly distressed at the condition of his lifemate. For severe body scorings, the assistance of a gold Dragon will be required to dampen the pain and keep the Dragon still enough for you to do your job. Take control of the situation, but make sure you ask the Rider before approaching the Dragon. Take control of the situation, but never forget to ask a Rider first for permission to approach their lifemate: big Dragon, in pain, equals a dangerous combination.
  2. Keep talking to the Rider if at all possible, to keep them lucid and in the here-and-now. It is also useful to keep the Rider from panicking at their lifemate's injury. Do your best to assess exactly how the clump of Thread hit the Dragon as this can help determine the best way to treat the wounds.
  3. Apply Numbweed to area. Be generous.
  4. Stitch hide back together (see Suturing for further details).
  5. Apply Numbweed once more if required.

Recovery:
Several sevendays. Check that there are no further injuries that have been missed. Rehabilitate slowly, using exercises designed for Weyrlinghood.

Cause 3: Severe ScoringEdit

Symptoms:

Wingsails, batten cartilages, wingbones, veins are all possibly affected to some degree. Dragon will need to be restrained by a queen as he/she likely to be in considerable agony. Rider will probably need dousing with wine into unconsciousness.

Treatment:

  1. The assistance of a gold Dragon will be required to dampen the pain and keep the Dragon still enough for you to do your job. Take control of the situation, but make sure you ask the Rider, if still conscious, before approaching the Dragon. Take control of the situation, but never forget to ask a Rider first for permission to approach their lifemate: big Dragon, in pain, equals a dangerous combination.
  2. Apply Numbweed to area. The more the better.
  3. Check for the formation of ichor. If it is not forming, either clear away some Numbweed with oil-soaked pads to check or start looking for severed veins that will need stitching first (see Suturing for further details).
  4. Splint bones if necessary. Thread can sever through the thinner bones. Stiff reeds serve admirably as splints for these bones.
  5. Cut lengths of fine cloth, usually the length of the leading or trailing edge is a good measure.
  6. Support the wing underneath with the cloth and stitch to wingbone, stretching it. You will need to stretch and relax the cloth as you stitch. This step will need a minimum of two people to accomplish.
  7. Fasten to underside with small stitches (see Suturing for further details). Try and stitch to areas that are not damaged.
  8. Lay on the wing fragments and brace trailing edges if required, using the gauze as a support. You will basically be figuring out a jigsaw puzzle. Take your time.
  9. Apply Numbweed, not the usual consistency but a thinner grade, over the cloth (Numbweed liquid).
  10. Float the wing pieces into some order and stitch where applicable and/or possible.
  11. If the tendons are damaged, basket reeds will need to be stitched (see Suturing for further details) to them in order to give support.
  1. Cover with more Numbweed!

Recovery:
Can be anywhere from a few months to a full Turn, depending on the severity of the injury. Dragonhealers should be careful of dehydration (see Dehydration for further details). Scar and new tissue will overgrow the old pieces causing the wing to look thick and unsightly. This will at first imbalance the Dragon. Over time the Dragon will compensate and the regenerated tissue will smooth out with wind-sand abrasion. Dragons can fly with one third of their exterior sails damaged. Inner wing injuries tend to be more serious, especially those closest the torso, since Thread can, depending on angle, sear through the wing and into the body, which may be fatal if it hits the lungs. Dragonhealers should rehabilitate their patients using wing strengthening exercises designed for Weyrlinghood.

Notes:
The cloth and basket reeds provide a guide for the shattered battens and sails to grow back correctly. If the cartilages dry out see information contained in 'Dried Out Cartilages '.

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